Don’t be afraid of white space

Have you ever come across a blog post or a comment that is quite lengthy and the words are all grouped together and the thoughts are one big mixed-up jumble and there are no pauses or breaks or spaces and the entire thing runs on and on quite possibly with multiple thoughts within the same paragraph and after reading a few sentences you notice your brain starts to hurt?

Add some white spaces.

Insert some empty lines.

Like I just did.

Just hit enter.

It’s not hard.

I love reading longer posts or comments but it is so tiring on the eyes and brain to see a huge clump of words all grouped together into one giant paragraph without a break or a breather.

Especially in comments. Comments require white space just as much as regular blog posts.

Don’t be afraid of a little white space. You will encourage, rather than discourage, people to continue reading. Because I can guarantee you, I am not one to stick around for long if you write on and on without white space. And I really do want to read you!

So please, remember:

White space is your friend. 🙂

We blog to share, but how much do we edit?

You know us bloggers are a special breed, right? Here we are, sharing our lives with each other, forming communities, liking and commenting on diverse topics and thereby broadening our perspectives regularly.

We are writers, all of us. But whether we admit it or not, we are also editors.

Continue reading We blog to share, but how much do we edit?

When responding to customers, please don’t use texting lingo

I have to say that some organizations really should get their administrative personnel trained on how to respond to a professional inquiry.

Here is a response I received from an optical place I was looking to visit for the first time to have my eyes checked:

Continue reading When responding to customers, please don’t use texting lingo

News, social media and the drama of the day

I used to consume the news every morning over coffee. I’d supplement the broadcast on TV by googling the stories that interested me on my phone, and then I’d get on with my day.

I still do this occasionally, but I tend to stick with a morning show that tells me pertinent information affecting me directly (weather, snow day school closures, transit delays, that sort of thing) rather than the more analytical, opinionated stories that require too much mental power to digest during the first coffee of the day. So a local TV breakfast show rather than a national overview.

Know what I mean?

There’s plenty of time to seek out the national and international news during another part of the day. If at all.

Sometimes however, I may just scan some headlines to get a quick fix; a sort of ‘satisfy my curiosity about x and y without too much detail’. In those circumstances, I tend to ask myself questions but then hesitate to delve deeper to find out more. You know, like this:

Continue reading News, social media and the drama of the day